Creating the perfect meetings

2014-11-13

Creating the perfect meetings

Why do some people talk all the time while others hardly dare to open their mouths? How can we rectify this imbalance? This book will help you set up a better meeting culture.

Would it not be great if meetings were only half as long, more invigorating, and a decision could be reached that everyone agreed on? Earlier this year the writers Chris Ertel and Lisa Kay Solomon published the book Moments of Impact: How to Design Strategic Conversations That Accelerate Change. The book has generated large interest since its publication, not least because of its clear description of the responsibility a meeting convener has to involve all meeting participants. How for instance can young new recruits be encouraged to dare open their mouths when colleagues in general are twice their age? A large part of the secret is in the preparations, like conducting mini interviews with participants in advance of the meeting. Participants can also be asked in advance about what results they expect and what topics they want to see brought to the table. This is an easy way to get people more involved and focussed. Another classic phenomenon that the writers raise is when there is a meeting between different departments in a company. It is often the case that someone consciously or unconsciously begins using difficult terminology to make others feel less informed. Meeting conveners must keep tabs on this type of overpowering language. Just as it might be a good idea to consider the various motives the meeting participants may have. Why does a person present their arguments in a certain way? What do they have to win or lose with a decision? If you are interested in meeting psychology then this book is the best and most interesting read this autumn.