The world's best workplace

2015-01-06

The world's best workplace

If you could decide yourself the layout of your workplace and how it should be run, what would it look like? The researchers Robb Goffey and Garreth Jones decided to find out by interviewing hundreds of managers all over the world for three years. Kinnarps has had a look at their findings.

What is the significance of happy employees for a company? More than you can imagine. When Goffey and Jones delved into the question, they found that companies with employees that are happy and are very committed to the business have a turnover that is four times greater than companies with problems. They also have a customer satisfaction rating of 89 per cent. So how can a company like this be achieved? One important component is culture, by recruiting people with different personalities that complement each other.
"We were looking for people that possibly did not fit in, but who take us down roads that we would never take," says Philip Dilley at Arup, one of the world's leading design and engineering companies.
Or take the British grocery chain Waitrose, for instance, which has understood how important loyal employees are, especially when work and leisure flow together. For this reason, they pay for half the cost of their employees' hobbies, whether it is piano lessons or cookery classes. While McDonalds in England earmark SEK 0.5 billion every year for the further education of their staff.
Goffey and Jones finally decided on six decisive factors on how to create the perfect workplace:
• You have to able to be yourself – in all situations.
• You are kept informed at all times of what is going on.
• Your strengths are noted and improved.
• The company stands for something meaningful.
• Your work feels fulfilling.
• There are no idiotic rules in place.
This is of course not rocket science, but what is interesting is that only a few of the companies examined by Goffey and Jones were able to comply with all six factors.
How well does your workplace do?